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Manage, promote, protect and preserve our lakes, rivers and streams

PCALR’s mission is to promote and preserve the natural, recreational, aesthetic and ecological qualities of our lakes and rivers; to provide a forum for public expression; to contact and inform public officials of specific problems of our area; and to join forces, if necessary, to achieve a goal deemed crucial by the members to change political opinion and influence governmental bodies.

Welcome

Thank you for visiting Polk County Association of Lakes and Rivers.

Our goal

Help lake organizations and citizens manage and protect Polk County’s beautiful lakes and rivers – for recreation, for wildlife, and for future generations.

Our Conviction

To insure that the recreation we enjoy at our lakes and rivers today endures for future generations, we must live in harmony with what we’ve come here to enjoy… the water, the wildlife and the special places of Polk County. As development and use rises, and threats from invasive species draw nearer, wise management and avid protection of our water bodies become paramount.

Our Hope

Participate! Plan to attend an upcoming meeting. Share your concerns about managing and protecting our natural resources. Become an active leader. While you do not need a membership to attend PCALR meetings, PCALR needs and appreciates your membership and support. 

Wisconsin Lakes Partnership Facebook Feeds

The Department of Natural Resources invites the public to comment on its draft Strategic Analysis of Aquatic Plant Management (APM) in Wisconsin. The report, which summarizes current information on APM in the state, serves as an informational resource to help decision-makers and the public to better understand the topic and to aid in the development of future APM policy.

Aquatic plants are a critical part of the state’s freshwater environment. They help to ensure good water quality and clarity, provide habitat and food for fish and wildlife, and serve many other valuable functions. Sometimes, though, aquatic plants can become overabundant and interfere with water uses. Managing these problems is complicated by the fact that some of the DNR rules governing APM have not been updated since 1986, while APM practices and challenges have evolved.

The draft Strategic Analysis report and links to more information about APM can be found on the department’s APM strategic analysis webpage, or by searching for the key words “aquatic plant management” on the department website, dnr.wi.gov.

Comments on this strategic analysis may be submitted through January 25, 2019, by email to DNRAPMSA@wisconsin.gov or sent via US Mail to Carroll Schaal, lakes and rivers section chief, 101 S. Webster Street, Madison, WI 53707-7921.
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